Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The farming of New Zealand : the people and the land / Gordon McLauchlan ; new photography by Ian Baker.

By: McLauchlan, Gordon, 1931- [author,, editor.].
Contributor(s): Baker, Ian, 1970- [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Viking, 2006Description: 264 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. map, ports. ; 31 cm.ISBN: 0670045624; 9870670045624.Subject(s): Agriculture -- New Zealand -- History -- Pictorial works | Māori (New Zealand people) -- Land tenure -- History | Colonists -- New Zealand | Agriculture -- New Zealand -- History | Farm life -- New Zealand -- History
Contents:
Farming is forever -- Pre-European farming -- The new crops, implements and animals -- A lanky land -- The first European farmers -- Sheep in the middle island -- Grain and ingenuity -- Unwelcome immigrants -- Refrigerated shipping -- Each day was 'just so many trees' -- The dairy industry -- The great ideal - land of one's own -- The marriage of farming and science -- The farmer's wae, and the aftermath -- Cast off after ninety years -- Food and the social revolution -- Opening the world to New Zealand milk -- The re-emergence of lamb -- The vagaries of beef -- Deer and goats -- The fall and rise of forests -- New fruit for old -- The vegetable business -- The future : a guessing game.
Summary: A tribute to our proud farming heritage. It celebrates the hard-working and entrepreneurial men and women involved in the industry that keeps their nation economically afloat. The skill and acumen of New Zealand farmers are respected around the world. It is an account of the lives of intrepid people who have taken risks, sometimes failed but more often have survived and made this country richer. It tells the story of pre-European times when Polynesians first arrived with tropical plants and had to adapt their lives quickly to a temperate climate. It describes the golden age of Maori farming, in the 1840s and 1850s, when tribes grew thousands of acres of grains, ground flour in their own mills, fed new settlers and exported grains, fruit and vegetables in their own vessels. It tells how refrigeration revolutionised farming; how farmers played their part in feeding the Allies in two world wars; how they survived Britain joining Europe; and how they recovered brilliantly to lead the national economic recovery after being told in 1985 that theirs was a sunset industry. Summary: A tribute to the New Zealand farming community. It explores key aspects of the development of NZ agriculture, beginning with early Polynesian farming and the methods of the first settlers.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Non Fiction Stratford
Non Fiction
Non Fiction 630.993 MCL (Browse shelf) 1 Available A00512826
Total holds: 0

Includes index.

Farming is forever -- Pre-European farming -- The new crops, implements and animals -- A lanky land -- The first European farmers -- Sheep in the middle island -- Grain and ingenuity -- Unwelcome immigrants -- Refrigerated shipping -- Each day was 'just so many trees' -- The dairy industry -- The great ideal - land of one's own -- The marriage of farming and science -- The farmer's wae, and the aftermath -- Cast off after ninety years -- Food and the social revolution -- Opening the world to New Zealand milk -- The re-emergence of lamb -- The vagaries of beef -- Deer and goats -- The fall and rise of forests -- New fruit for old -- The vegetable business -- The future : a guessing game.

A tribute to our proud farming heritage. It celebrates the hard-working and entrepreneurial men and women involved in the industry that keeps their nation economically afloat. The skill and acumen of New Zealand farmers are respected around the world. It is an account of the lives of intrepid people who have taken risks, sometimes failed but more often have survived and made this country richer. It tells the story of pre-European times when Polynesians first arrived with tropical plants and had to adapt their lives quickly to a temperate climate. It describes the golden age of Maori farming, in the 1840s and 1850s, when tribes grew thousands of acres of grains, ground flour in their own mills, fed new settlers and exported grains, fruit and vegetables in their own vessels. It tells how refrigeration revolutionised farming; how farmers played their part in feeding the Allies in two world wars; how they survived Britain joining Europe; and how they recovered brilliantly to lead the national economic recovery after being told in 1985 that theirs was a sunset industry.

A tribute to the New Zealand farming community. It explores key aspects of the development of NZ agriculture, beginning with early Polynesian farming and the methods of the first settlers.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

©South Taranaki District Council

Contact us