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Orphan train : a novel /

By: Kline, Christina Baker, 1964-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : William Morrow, c2012Edition: 1st ed.Description: 278, 16 p. 21 cm.ISBN: 9780061950728; 0061950726.Subject(s): Women - Fiction | Orphan trains - Fiction | Female friendship - Fiction
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Fiction Stratford
Fiction
Fiction KLI (Browse shelf) 1 Available A00698139
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Between 1854 and 1929, so-called orphan trains ran regularly from the cities of the East Coast to the farmlands of the Midwest, carrying thousands of abandoned children whose fates would be determined by pure luck. Would they be adopted by a kind and loving family, or would they face a childhood and adolescence of hard labor and servitude?</p> <p>As a young Irish immigrant, Vivian Daly was one such child, sent by rail from New York City to an uncertain future a world away. Returning east later in life, Vivian leads a quiet, peaceful existence on the coast of Maine, the memories of her upbringing rendered a hazy blur. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past.</p> <p>Seventeen-year-old Molly Ayer knows that a community-service position helping an elderly widow clean out her attic is the only thing keeping her out of juvenile hall. But as Molly helps Vivian sort through her keepsakes and possessions, she discovers that she and Vivian aren't as different as they appear. A Penobscot Indian who has spent her youth in and out of foster homes, Molly is also an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past.</p> <p>Moving between contemporary Maine and Depression-era Minnesota, Orphan Train is a powerful tale of upheaval and resilience, second chances, and unexpected friendship.</p>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Kline's latest novel (after Bird in Hand) weaves contemporary and historical fiction into a compelling story about loss, adaptability, and courage. Molly is a rebellious 17-year-old foster child sentenced to community service for stealing a copy of Jane Eyre. She finds a position cleaning out the attic of Vivian, an elderly woman in their coastal Maine town. As Molly sorts through old trunks and boxes, Vivian begins to share stories from her past. Born in County Galway, she immigrated to New York City in 1929. When her family perished in a tenement fire, she was packed off on one of the many orphan trains intended to bring children to Midwestern families who would care for them. Each orphan's lot was largely dependent on the luck of the draw. In this, Vivian's life parallels Molly's, and an unlikely friendship blossoms. VERDICT With compassion and delicacy Kline presents a little-known chapter of American history and draws comparisons with the modern-day foster care system. Her accessible, interesting novel will appeal to readers who enjoy the work of Sara Donati. [See Prepub Alert, 10/22/12.]-Christine Perkins, Bellingham P.L., WA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Comment by Lynne
03/07/2015

A novel which is well written and explores a chapter of American history when thousands of children who were abandoned by their parent or orphaned in New York were sent by train into the Midwest for other families to claim / adopt/ or use as free labour . Families were split up, babies and younger children were chosen first. The story follows one girl and the impact it had on her life. Running parallel is another story of a modern teenager also abandoned by her mother after the father died. When these two meet the first child is 92 years old. In telling her story she helps the other girl. I really enjoyed this story. Lynne

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