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Bird box / Josh Malerman.

By: Malerman, Josh [author.].
Series: Malerman, Josh, Bird box: book 1.Description: 292 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780007529872 ; 0007529872 .Subject(s): Parent and child -- Fiction | Blind -- Fiction | Survival -- Fiction | Michigan -- FictionGenre/Form: Horror tales. | Psychological fiction.DDC classification: 813.6 Action note: Horror.Summary: Most people ignored the outrageous reports on the news. But they became too frequent, they became too real. And soon, they began happening down the street. Then the Internet died. The television and radio went silent. The phones stopped ringing. And we couldn't look outside anymore. Malorie raises the children the only way she can; indoors. The house is quiet. The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows. They are out there. She might let them in. The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall. Soon she will have to wake them. Soon she will have to blindfold them. Today they must leave the house. Today they will risk everything.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Suspense Pātea LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction MALE (Browse shelf) Available I2131348
Fiction Stratford
Fiction
Fiction MAL (Browse shelf) Available A00722331
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Josh Malerman's debut novel BIRD BOX is a terrifying, Hitchcockesque psychological horror that is sure to stay with you long after reading. Malorie raises the children the only way she can: indoors. The house is quiet. The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows. They are out there. She might let them in. The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall. Soon she will have to wake them. Soon she will have to blindfold them. Today they must leave the house. Today they will risk everything.

Most people ignored the outrageous reports on the news. But they became too frequent, they became too real. And soon, they began happening down the street. Then the Internet died. The television and radio went silent. The phones stopped ringing. And we couldn't look outside anymore. Malorie raises the children the only way she can; indoors. The house is quiet. The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows. They are out there. She might let them in. The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall. Soon she will have to wake them. Soon she will have to blindfold them. Today they must leave the house. Today they will risk everything.

Horror.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

There is something out there. Something that drives people insane from simply seeing it. In their postapocalyptic world where looking outside is potentially deadly, -Malorie and her two children live in perpetual darkness with blacked-out windows, blindfolding themselves when they venture outside. But Malorie can survive on her own for only so long. Hoping to find a safer place to live, she takes her children on a -20-mile trip down the river that runs behind their house. Blindfolded and alert to every sound, they set out on a journey that will require Malorie to use everything that she has to get her children to safety. Because something is following them, something that wants them to take off their blindfolds. VERDICT A good horror story lets the tension build slowly, eventually ending in a nail-biting crisis that is finally resolved by the novel's last page. Debut author Malerman, however, takes the pressure level from zero to 100 on page one and attempts to keep it there for the entire book. That extreme suspense becomes tedious after about 50 pages, and yet there are another 200-plus pages that the reader must get through. Malerman does attempt to add dimension to his protoganist by interspersing her backstory into the main plotline, but that addition only serves to make the peripheral characters more interesting than Malorie. With an anticlimactic ending, there is little reward here for the faithful reader who perseveres to the end.-Elisabeth Clark, West Florida P.L., Pensacola (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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