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The wolf border / Sarah Hall.

By: Hall, Sarah, 1974- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Faber & Faber, 2015Description: 435 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780571299553 (pbk.); 0571299555 (pbk.).Subject(s): Wolves -- Fiction | Women zoologists -- Fiction | Man-woman relationships -- FictionSummary: For almost a decade Rachel Caine has turned her back on home, kept distant by family disputes and her work monitoring wolves on an Idaho reservation. But now, summoned by the eccentric Earl of Annerdale and his controversial scheme to reintroduce the Grey Wolf to the English countryside, she is back in the peat and wet light of the Lake District. The earl's project harks back to an ancient idyll of untamed British wilderness - though Rachel must contend with modern-day concessions to health and safety, public outrage and political gain - and the return of the Grey after hundreds of years coincides with her own regeneration: impending motherhood, and reconciliation with her estranged family. But Rachel must also contend with public outrage, sabotage - and the scepticism of those closer to home.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Eltham LibraryPlus
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Fiction HALL (Browse shelf) Available i2143054
Fiction Hāwera LibraryPlus
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Fiction HALL (Browse shelf) Checked out 10/05/2019 i2146128
Fiction Stratford
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Fiction HAL (Browse shelf) Checked out 16/05/2019 A00747373
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

For almost a decade Rachel Caine has turned her back on home, kept distant by family disputes and her work monitoring wolves on an Idaho reservation. But now, summoned by the eccentric Earl of Annerdale and his controversial scheme to reintroduce the Grey Wolf to the English countryside, she is back in the peat and wet light of the Lake District. <p>The earl's project harks back to an ancient idyll of untamed British wilderness - though Rachel must contend with modern-day concessions to health and safety, public outrage and political gain - and the return of the Grey after hundreds of years coincides with her own regeneration: impending motherhood, and reconciliation with her estranged family.</p> <p>The Wolf Border investigates the fundamental nature of wilderness and wildness, both animal and human. It seeks to understand the most obsessive aspects of humanity: sex, love, and conflict; the desire to find answers to the question of our existence; those complex systems that govern the most superior creature on earth.</p>

For almost a decade Rachel Caine has turned her back on home, kept distant by family disputes and her work monitoring wolves on an Idaho reservation. But now, summoned by the eccentric Earl of Annerdale and his controversial scheme to reintroduce the Grey Wolf to the English countryside, she is back in the peat and wet light of the Lake District. The earl's project harks back to an ancient idyll of untamed British wilderness - though Rachel must contend with modern-day concessions to health and safety, public outrage and political gain - and the return of the Grey after hundreds of years coincides with her own regeneration: impending motherhood, and reconciliation with her estranged family. But Rachel must also contend with public outrage, sabotage - and the scepticism of those closer to home.

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Library Journal Review

Wolves are social animals, living in packs with a strict social structure. Human families are much more complicated, as Rachel Caine knows firsthand. Not exactly "raised by wolves" but rather more interested in drinking and men than in her two children, Rachel stayed at home (and in conflict) with her own mother until age 18, though half-brother Lawrence left home at 14. Inspired by a childhood encounter with wolves confined at a suburban English park, Rachel goes on to become a world-renowned expert in the species. She is working as a project leader for a group of reintroduced wolves in the northwestern United States and hasn't returned to England, even to see her dying mother, in years when suddenly she gets a call from an extremely wealthy Englishman with a plan to reintroduce wolves to the English countryside. Rachel commits to a visit, nothing more, but the idea of bringing wolves back to her home country is compelling. When she faces a major life change, the idea of reuniting with family suddenly isn't so unthinkable. Verdict One of Granta's Best Young British Novelists, Hall (How To Paint a Dead Man) offers an earthy novel, successfully exploring ideas of family, maternity, personal demons, social class, and wilderness vs. urban development. Interesting and original, it should have wide appeal. [See Prepub Alert, 12/15/14.]-Shaunna E. Hunter, Hampden-Sydney Coll. Lib., VA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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