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Entanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.

By: Ballantyne, Tony, 1972- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookDescription: xii, 360 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781869408268.Subject(s): Human body -- Social aspects -- Cross-cultural studies | Māori (New Zealand people) -- Missions -- History -- 19th century | Tinana | Mīhana | Tikanga | New Zealand -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 306.4
Contents:
Introduction: bodies in contact, bodies in question -- Exploration, empire and evngelisation -- Making place, reordering space -- Economics, labour and time -- Containing transgression -- Cultures of death -- Th epolitics of the "enfeebled" body -- Conclusion: bodies and the entanglements of empire"--Publisher's website.
Summary: "The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Māori. Entanglements of Empire is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period. Misunderstanding was rife: the physical body itself became the most contentious site of cultural engagement, as Māori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality. Author explores the varying understandings of such concepts as civilization, work, time and space, and gender - and the practical consequences of the struggles over these ideas. The encounters in the classroom, chapel, kitchen, and farmyard worked mutually to affect both the Māori and the English worldviews. Ultimately, the interest in missionary Christianity among influential Māori chiefs had far-reaching consequences for both groups. Concluding in 1840 with the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi and the new age it ushered in, Ballantyne's book offers important insights into this crucial period of New Zealand history"--Publisher's information.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Non Fiction Manaia LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Non Fiction 306.4 BALL (Browse shelf) Available (Available) I2142861
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period. Misunderstanding was rife, and the physical body itself became the most contentious site of cultural engagement. Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. Tony Ballantyne explores the varying understandings of such concepts as civilization, work, time and space, and gender -- and the practical consequences of the struggles over these ideas. The encounters in the classroom, chapel, kitchen, and farmyard worked mutually to affect both the Maori and the English worldviews.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: bodies in contact, bodies in question -- 1. Exploration, empire and evngelisation -- 2. Making place, reordering space -- 3. Economics, labour and time -- 4. Containing transgression -- 5. Cultures of death -- 6. Th epolitics of the "enfeebled" body -- Conclusion: bodies and the entanglements of empire"--Publisher's website.

"The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Māori. Entanglements of Empire is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period. Misunderstanding was rife: the physical body itself became the most contentious site of cultural engagement, as Māori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality. Author explores the varying understandings of such concepts as civilization, work, time and space, and gender - and the practical consequences of the struggles over these ideas. The encounters in the classroom, chapel, kitchen, and farmyard worked mutually to affect both the Māori and the English worldviews. Ultimately, the interest in missionary Christianity among influential Māori chiefs had far-reaching consequences for both groups. Concluding in 1840 with the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi and the new age it ushered in, Ballantyne's book offers important insights into this crucial period of New Zealand history"--Publisher's information.

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