The dust that falls from dreams / Louis de Bernieres.

Nā: De Bernières, Louis [author.].
Momo rauemi: materialTypeLabelPukapukaWhakaahuatanga: 515 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781846558771 (paperback).Ngā marau: World War, 1914-1918 -- Fiction | Great Britain -- History -- Edward VII, 1901-1910 -- Fiction | Great Britain -- History -- George V, 1910-1936 -- FictionDDC classification: 823.92 Summary: In the brief golden years of the Edwardian era, Rosie McCosh and her three sisters are growing up in an idyllic household in the countryside south of London. With their neighbors, the two Pitt brothers and the three Pendennis boys, they are The Pals. But these days of childhood camaraderie and adventure are brought to an abrupt end by the outbreak of World War I, in which some will lose their lives, some their loved ones, some their faith, and all of them their innocence. We follow them through the years of the war in the trenches, in air battles, in the hospitals where the women serve with as much passion and nearly as much hardship as the men at the front and its aftermath as the modern world slowly emerges out of the ashes of the old. A wholly immersive novel about a particular time and place, this novel also illuminates the timeless ways in which men and women carry profound loss alongside indelible hope.
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Ngā whakaahuatanga whakarei nā Syndetics:

In the brief golden years of King Edward VII's reign, Rosie McCosh and her three very different sisters are growing up in an eccentric household in Kent, with their neighbours the Pitt boys on one side and the Pendennis boys on the other. But their days of childhood adventure are shadowed by the approach of war that will engulf them on the cusp of adulthood.

When the boys end up scattered along the Western Front, Rosie faces the challenges of life for those left behind. Confused by her love for two young men - one an infantry soldier and one a flying ace - she has to navigate her way through extraordinary times. Can she, and her sisters, build new lives out of the opportunities and devastations that follow the Great War?

Louis de Bernières' magnificent and moving novel follows the lives of an unforgettable cast of characters as they strike out to seek what happiness can be built from the ruins of the old world.

In the brief golden years of the Edwardian era, Rosie McCosh and her three sisters are growing up in an idyllic household in the countryside south of London. With their neighbors, the two Pitt brothers and the three Pendennis boys, they are The Pals. But these days of childhood camaraderie and adventure are brought to an abrupt end by the outbreak of World War I, in which some will lose their lives, some their loved ones, some their faith, and all of them their innocence. We follow them through the years of the war in the trenches, in air battles, in the hospitals where the women serve with as much passion and nearly as much hardship as the men at the front and its aftermath as the modern world slowly emerges out of the ashes of the old. A wholly immersive novel about a particular time and place, this novel also illuminates the timeless ways in which men and women carry profound loss alongside indelible hope.

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Library Journal Review

Three childhood friends-Ash Pendennis, Rosie McCosh, and Daniel Pitt-come of age with the Great War. Ash proposes to Rosie, joins the army, and dies within a few months at the front. Devastated, Rosie volunteers to nurse the wounded in England, and she excels in this role but remains frozen emotionally. Daniel becomes a pilot and, to his great amazement, survives the war. The two young men provide the opportunity to describe warfare in the trenches and in the air-the camaraderie and loss, the killing, maiming, and death. When Daniel and Rosie return home, they face a future neither had expected and aren't sure how to navigate. Daniel wants to marry Rosie and start anew, but she holds on to the past and her memories of Ash. Many characters have brief but important roles showing other ways of dealing with war and its aftermath. Most enjoyable are Rosie's kindly and humorous father and her eccentric, self-centered mother. David Sibley narrates most of the book, with occasional bits read by Avita Jay. Sibley's mellifluous voice is a great choice here. He convincingly portrays a troubled young woman, a stalwart young man enduring the horrors of the battle, a kind and loving clergyman, a woman who is slowly losing her sanity, a plucky servant girl, and a host of others. Jay has an appealing voice and reads her passages with feeling; it's unclear why her role is so limited. VERDICT Recommended for listeners who love historical fiction.-Juleigh Muirhead Clark, Colonial Williamsburg Fdn. Lib., VA © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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