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Three weeks in December / Audrey Schulman.

By: Schulman, Audrey, 1963-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Europa Editions, 2012Description: 353 pages : maps ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781609450649 (pbk.); 1609450647 (pbk.).Subject(s): Railroad engineers -- Fiction | Ethnobotanists -- Fiction | Animals -- Africa -- Fiction | Human ecology -- Fiction | Asperger's syndrome -- Fiction | Gay men -- Fiction | Africa -- FictionDDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: This novel interweaves the perspectives of Jeremy, an engineer who leaves small-town Maine in 1899 to oversee the construction of a railroad across East Africa, and finds himself the reluctant hunter of two lions killing his men in nightly attacks; and Max, an American ethnobotanist who travels to Rwanda in 2000 in search of an obscure vine that could become a lifesaving pharmaceutical, but finds herself shadowing a family of gorillas whose survival is threatened by a violent rebel group from nearby Congo.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In 1899 Jeremy, a young engineer, leaves a small town in Maine to oversee the construction of a railroad across East Afria. Plagued by fear, he becomes the reluctant hunter of two lions who are killing his men in nightly attacks on their camp. In 2000 Max, an American ethnobotanist, is stationed in Rwanda where she shadows a family of gorillas, but their solidarity is threatened by a violent rebel group from Congo that draws ever nearer. Told in alternating perspectives, the fates of these two characters entwine to culminate in a shocking resonant conclusion.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [351]-353).

This novel interweaves the perspectives of Jeremy, an engineer who leaves small-town Maine in 1899 to oversee the construction of a railroad across East Africa, and finds himself the reluctant hunter of two lions killing his men in nightly attacks; and Max, an American ethnobotanist who travels to Rwanda in 2000 in search of an obscure vine that could become a lifesaving pharmaceutical, but finds herself shadowing a family of gorillas whose survival is threatened by a violent rebel group from nearby Congo.

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Library Journal Review

Its abundance has made Africa ripe for exploitation, but among those who arrive with less-than-honorable intentions are some who will become so enthralled with the land and its inhabitants that they cannot-will not-leave. In 1899, Maine engineer Jeremy hires on with the British to supervise the construction of a railroad through East Africa, paving the way for English settlers while carelessly displacing the indigenous people. Some 100 years later, Max, an ethnobotanist chosen by a "big pharma" corporation, travels to a gorilla research facility in Rwanda to test and return with a rare vine that could become a medical miracle. In alternating chapters, Schulman (The Cage) weaves two mesmerizing tales based on historical fact and enlivened by sympathetic, fully formed characters. Jeremy feels compelled to prove his manhood when his encampment of Indian workers is threatened by a pair of aggressive lions, while Max immerses herself in the silent world of the endangered gorilla families. VERDICT Teaching without preaching, Schulman speaks to the dichotomy between the preservationists and the destroyers of Africa's resources while treating readers to a veritable visceral cornucopia of the senses. This beautiful novel deserves wide readership.-Sally Bissell, Lee Cty. Lib., Ft. Myers, FL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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