Two great New Zealanders : the wisdom of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata / John Robinson.

By: Robinson, John, 1940- [author.]
Material type: TextTextDescription: 328 pages : illustrations (chiefly colour) ; 22 cmISBN: 9781872970455; 1872970451Other title: 2 great New ZealandersSubject(s): Nene, Tamati Waka, -1871 | Ngata, Apirana Turupa, Sir, 1874-1950 | Leadership -- New Zealand | Māori (New Zealand people) -- Cultural assimilation | Mana ake | Mōhiotanga | Pukapuka kāhui kōrero | Toa | Noho-ā-iwi | Māori (New Zealand people) -- BiographyDDC classification: 303.48208999442 LOC classification: HD57.7 | .R6336 2015Summary: "Inter-tribal warfare was a central feature of Maori culture but, as the carnage grew with the coming of the musket, many northern chiefs became disillusioned with the constant demands of utu and moved away from their old habits to the ways of peace as advocated by the missionaries. Tamati Waka Nene was one of them and he made the keynote speech at Waitangi, urging the chiefs to sign the Treaty as a way of ending the killing. Apirana Ngata grew up in two cultures and, as an M. P. and Government minister, became a spokesman for Maori, seeking to preserve their worthwhile traditions while rejecting the more harmful like witchcraft. The examples of these two men show a way ahead for 21st century New Zealand - away from separatism and the glorification of the deeds of long dead warrior chiefs, and towards the one nation that was envisaged in the Treaty of Waitangi."--From publisher.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Māoritanga Hāwera LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 303.482 (Browse shelf) Available I2159266
Māoritanga Ōpunakē LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 303.482 (Browse shelf) Checked out 06/03/2020 I2154960
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Includes bibliographical references.

"Inter-tribal warfare was a central feature of Maori culture but, as the carnage grew with the coming of the musket, many northern chiefs became disillusioned with the constant demands of utu and moved away from their old habits to the ways of peace as advocated by the missionaries. Tamati Waka Nene was one of them and he made the keynote speech at Waitangi, urging the chiefs to sign the Treaty as a way of ending the killing. Apirana Ngata grew up in two cultures and, as an M. P. and Government minister, became a spokesman for Maori, seeking to preserve their worthwhile traditions while rejecting the more harmful like witchcraft. The examples of these two men show a way ahead for 21st century New Zealand - away from separatism and the glorification of the deeds of long dead warrior chiefs, and towards the one nation that was envisaged in the Treaty of Waitangi."--From publisher.

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