Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Dunedin / Shena Mackay

By: Mackay, Shena [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Little, Brown Book Group , 2016Description: 419 pages ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780349007199; 0349007195.Subject(s): Man-woman relationships -- Fiction | Abduction -- Fiction | Dunedin (N.Z.) -- Fiction | Immigrants -- New Zealand -- Fiction. -- New ZealandGenre/Form: New Zealand fiction -- 21st century.Subject: Rich, vivid and dazzlingly funny, Shena Mackay's brilliant novel opens in 19th century New Zealand. Jack Mackenzie, the Presbyterian minister newly arrived from Scotland with his unhappy wife, enjoys the pleasures, botanical and carnal, that Dunedin offers. His expulsion from his naturalist's Eden has consequences he never dreams of. Decades later, in London, his grandchildren, middle-aged and with life evaporating before them, search for love. Olive, embittered and lonely, tries to find it with Terry, an ambitious young writer in flight from his aged parents' mobile home, and more dangerously, with a baby she snatches on a crowded tube train. Her brother William, desiccated with grief for the death of a former pupil, has abandoned his job as headmaster. There is also Jay Pascal, a young New Zealand vagrant of mysterious parentage, whose sad plight to find belonging sears the heart.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Hāwera LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction MacKAY (Browse shelf) Available i2155566
New Zealand Fiction Stratford
Fiction
Fiction MCK (Browse shelf) Available A00778627
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>New Zealand, 1909. After weeks at sea the new minister, Jack Mackenzie, arrives from Scotland with his unhappy wife and children in tow. A keen naturalist, he is more enthralled by the botanical - and carnal - delights of Dunedin than in the wellbeing of his flock.<br> In London, eighty years later, Jack Mackenzie's descendants are middle-aged, searching for a way out of their loneliness. Olive, embittered with her loveless life, steals a baby from a crowded tube; William, distraught at the death of a pupil, abandons his job as headmaster and struggles to fill his empty days. Jay Pascal, a young New Zealand vagrant of mysterious parentage arrives in London, looking for a place where he might belong.</p>

Rich, vivid and dazzlingly funny, Shena Mackay's brilliant novel opens in 19th century New Zealand. Jack Mackenzie, the Presbyterian minister newly arrived from Scotland with his unhappy wife, enjoys the pleasures, botanical and carnal, that Dunedin offers. His expulsion from his naturalist's Eden has consequences he never dreams of. Decades later, in London, his grandchildren, middle-aged and with life evaporating before them, search for love. Olive, embittered and lonely, tries to find it with Terry, an ambitious young writer in flight from his aged parents' mobile home, and more dangerously, with a baby she snatches on a crowded tube train. Her brother William, desiccated with grief for the death of a former pupil, has abandoned his job as headmaster. There is also Jay Pascal, a young New Zealand vagrant of mysterious parentage, whose sad plight to find belonging sears the heart.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In her latest novel (after A Bowl of Cherries , Moyer Bell, Ltd., 1992), Mackay drifts from New Zealand circa 1909 to London in 1989 as she spins the saga of the unholy Rev. Jack Mackenzie and his clan. Most of the book focuses on his three grandchildren, each a tortured soul on a personal quest. Olive, divorced and now estranged from her lover, reluctantly retreats for sanctuary to the home of her brother William, an ex-schoolmaster trapped in an abyss of guilt over the death of one of his former students. Jay, the illegitimate Mackenzie, sails to England to locate his late grandfather's London house; once a stately mansion, Dunedin has deteriorated into a festering mausoleum sheltering the homeless. With her brooding plot, Mackay creates a kaleidoscope of despair, hope, love, and destruction depicted in fine, lyrical prose. Recommended for public libraries.-- Mary Ellen Elsbernd, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

©South Taranaki District Council

Contact us