Tupuna Awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.

By: Muru-Lanning, Marama [author.]
Material type: TextTextDescription: 230 pages ; 24 cmISBN: 9781869408503; 1869408500Subject(s): Māori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- Waikato -- Politics and government | Māori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- Waikato -- Government relations | Mana o te wai | Awa | Tōrangapū | Noho-ā-iwi | Waikato (N.Z.) -- Politics and government | Waikato River (N.Z.) -- Water rights | KāwanatangaDDC classification: 320.9008994420933 Subject: "Tupuna Awa looks at the people and politics of the Waikato River. For iwi and hapū of the lands that border its 425-kilometre length, the Waikato River is an ancestor, a taonga and a source of mauri, lying at the heart of identity and chiefly power. It is also subject to governing oversight by the Crown and intersected by hydro-stations managed by state-owned power companies: a situation rife with complexity and subject to shifting and subtle power dynamics. Marama Muru-Lanning explains how Māori of the region, the Crown and Mighty River Power have talked about the ownership, guardianship and stakeholders of the river. By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power"--Publisher information.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Māoritanga Hāwera LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 320.9 (Browse shelf) Available I2160841
Total holds: 0

"Tupuna Awa looks at the people and politics of the Waikato River. For iwi and hapū of the lands that border its 425-kilometre length, the Waikato River is an ancestor, a taonga and a source of mauri, lying at the heart of identity and chiefly power. It is also subject to governing oversight by the Crown and intersected by hydro-stations managed by state-owned power companies: a situation rife with complexity and subject to shifting and subtle power dynamics. Marama Muru-Lanning explains how Māori of the region, the Crown and Mighty River Power have talked about the ownership, guardianship and stakeholders of the river. By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power"--Publisher information.

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