Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Kintu / Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi with an introduction by Aaron Bady.

By: Makumbi, Jennifer Nansubuga [author.].
Contributor(s): Bady, Aaron [writer of introduction.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookDescription: viii, 443 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781945492013; 1945492015; 9781945492037; 1945492031.Subject(s): Families -- Uganda -- Fiction | Ethnohistory -- Uganda -- Fiction | Chiefdoms -- Uganda -- History -- Fiction | Ugandan fiction (English) | Uganda -- History -- Fiction | Uganda -- Origin -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction.DDC classification: 823/.92 Summary: 'First published in Kenya in 2014 to critical and popular acclaim, Kintu is a modern classic, a multilayered narrative that reimagines the history of Uganda through the cursed bloodline of the Kintu clan. Divided into six sections, the novel begins in 1750, when Kintu Kidda sets out for the capital to pledge allegiance to the new leader of the Buganda Kingdom. Along the way, he unleashes a curse that will plague his family for generations. In an ambitious tale of a clan and a nation, Makumbi weaves together the stories of Kintu's descendants as they seek to break from the burden of their shared past and reconcile the inheritance of tradition and the modern world that is their future."--Back cover.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Eltham LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction MAKU (Browse shelf) Available I2173479
Fiction Stratford
Fiction
Fiction MAK (Browse shelf) Available A00816966
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2017 </p> <p> Winner of the Windham-Campbell Prize </p> <p> Winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize </p> <p>"A soaring and sublime epic. One of those great stories that was just waiting to be told."-- Marlon James, Man Booker Prize-winning author of A Brief History of Seven Killings </p> <p>First published in Kenya in 2014 to critical and popular acclaim, Kintu is a modern classic, a multilayered narrative that reimagines the history of Uganda through the cursed bloodline of the Kintu clan. Divided into six sections, the novel begins in 1750, when Kintu Kidda sets out for the capital to pledge allegiance to the new leader of the Buganda Kingdom. Along the way, he unleashes a curse that will plague his family for generations. In an ambitious tale of a clan and a nation, Makumbi weaves together the stories of Kintu's descendants as they seek to break from the burden of their shared past and reconcile the inheritance of tradition and the modern world that is their future.</p>

"First published in 2014 by Kwani Trust, Nairobi ."--Title verso page.

'First published in Kenya in 2014 to critical and popular acclaim, Kintu is a modern classic, a multilayered narrative that reimagines the history of Uganda through the cursed bloodline of the Kintu clan. Divided into six sections, the novel begins in 1750, when Kintu Kidda sets out for the capital to pledge allegiance to the new leader of the Buganda Kingdom. Along the way, he unleashes a curse that will plague his family for generations. In an ambitious tale of a clan and a nation, Makumbi weaves together the stories of Kintu's descendants as they seek to break from the burden of their shared past and reconcile the inheritance of tradition and the modern world that is their future."--Back cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This ambitious multigenerational tale of the cursed bloodline of Uganda's Kintu clan begins in 1750 with the treacherous journey of Kintu Kidda, who travels with his men through the o Lwera desert to prove his loyalty to the Bagandan kingdom, though his lineage differs. He has a number of families across the kingdom, but in an act of kindness, he adopts Kalema, son of Ntwire, a worker who tends his land. During one trek, Kintu hits Kalema for breaking custom, inadvertently killing him. He and his men refuse to share the details of the death with the village, but Ntwire senses that something is amiss and curses Kintu before leaving to search for his son. The narrative then chronicles the history of various clan members until 2004, when the author began writing this epic tale. Published in Kenya in 2014, this book won the Kwani Manuscript Prize and was long-listed for the Etisalat Prize for African Fiction. What is most impressive is the interwoven history and language of Uganda within the fictional narrative. VERDICT Reminiscent of -Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, this work will appeal to lovers of African literature.-Ashanti White, Fayetteville, NC © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

©South Taranaki District Council

Contact us