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A baby's bones / Rebecca Alexander.

By: Alexander, Rebecca, 1960- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Alexander, Rebecca, Sage Westfield: book 1.Publisher: London : Titan Books, 2018Edition: First edition.Description: 473 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781785656217; 178565621X.Subject(s): Women archaeologists -- Fiction | Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction | Women -- Crimes against -- Fiction | Infants -- Crimes against -- Fiction | Cold cases (Criminal investigation) -- FictionGenre/Form: Detective and mystery stories. | Thrillers (Fiction).DDC classification: 823/.92 Action note: Crime.Summary: "Archaeologist Sage Westfield has been called in to excavate a sixteenth-century well, and expects to find little more than soil and the odd piece of pottery. But the disturbing discovery of the bones of a woman and newborn baby make it clear that she has stumbled onto an historical crime scene, one that is interwoven with an unsettling local legend of witchcraft and unrequited love. Yet there is more to the case than a four-hundred-year-old mystery. The owners of a nearby cottage are convinced that it is haunted, and the local vicar is being plagued with abusive phone calls. Then a tragic death makes it all too clear that a modern murderer is at work."--Provided by publisher.
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Suspense Eltham LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction ALEX (Browse shelf) Available i2184641
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"Finely observed beautifully written" Daily Mail on The Secrets of Life and Death <br> <br> "It was a secret burial. Maybe even murder..."<br> <br> Archaeologist Sage Westfield has been called in to excavate a sixteenth-century well, and expects to find little more than soil and the odd piece of pottery. But the disturbing discovery of the bones of a woman and newborn baby make it clear that she has stumbled onto an historical crime scene, one that is interwoven with an unsettling local legend of witchcraft and unrequited love. Yet there is more to the case than a four-hundred-year-old mystery. The owners of a nearby cottage are convinced that it is haunted, and the local vicar is being plagued with abusive phone calls. Then a tragic death makes it all too clear that a modern murderer is at work...

"Archaeologist Sage Westfield has been called in to excavate a sixteenth-century well, and expects to find little more than soil and the odd piece of pottery. But the disturbing discovery of the bones of a woman and newborn baby make it clear that she has stumbled onto an historical crime scene, one that is interwoven with an unsettling local legend of witchcraft and unrequited love. Yet there is more to the case than a four-hundred-year-old mystery. The owners of a nearby cottage are convinced that it is haunted, and the local vicar is being plagued with abusive phone calls. Then a tragic death makes it all too clear that a modern murderer is at work."--Provided by publisher.

Crime.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Archaeologist Sage Westfield only has a short time to excavate a 16th-century well on the Isle of Wight, as the property's owner is dying. Sage is in the late stages of her pregnancy. She's been warned the well is unsafe. When she uncovers bones belonging to a baby and an adult, probably a woman, Sage and her team attempt to piece together the history of those remains. A parallel account, written by the steward to Lord Banstock during the Tudor years, reveals the horrifying story of a pregnant woman hounded and accused of witchcraft. Sage continues her search for answers despite the feeling she's being watched. When a new body is found in the well, past and present crimes begin to converge. In a departure from her supernatural crime novels (The Secrets of Time and Fate), Alexander carefully constructs an intricately plotted mystery that links story lines of madness and murder. Bittersweet and haunting, this suspenseful story is driven by complex, flawed characters. VERDICT Fans of Kate Ellis's "Wesley" mysteries and Elly Griffith's atmospheric "Ruth Galloway" novels will enjoy the combination of archaeology and history.-Lesa Holstine, Evansville Vanderburgh P.L., IN © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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