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In/visible sight : the mixed-descent families of Southern New Zealand / Angela Wanhalla.

By: Wanhalla, Angela.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z. : Bridget Williams Books, 2009Description: 208 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781877242434 (pbk.) :.Other title: Invisible sight [Other title].Subject(s): Ngāi Tahu (Maori people) -- Relations with Europeans | Interracial marriage -- New Zealand -- South Island | Tatau pounamu | Mārenatanga | Tikanga-ā-iwi | Whakapapa | Whanaungatanga | South Island (N.Z.)Summary: Angela Wanhalla starts her story with the mixed-descent community at Maitapapa, Taieri, where her great-grandparents, John Brown and Mabel Smith, were born. As the book took shape, a community emerged from the records, re-casting history and identity in the present. Drawing on the experiences of mixed-descent families, In/visible Sight examines the early history of cross-cultural encounter and colonisation in southern New Zealand. There Ngāi Tahu engaged with the European newcomers on a sustained scale from the 1820s, encountering systematic settlement from the 1840s and fighting land alienation from the 1850s. The evolving social world was one framed by marriage, kinship networks and cultural practices - a world in which inter-racial intimacy played a formative role. In exploring this history through a particular group of family networks, In/visible Sight offers new insights into New Zealand's colonial past. Marriage as a fundamental social institution in the nineteenth century takes on a different shape when seen through the lens of cross-cultural encounters. The book also outlines some of the contours and ambiguities involved in living as mixed descent in colonial New Zealand.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Māoritanga Pātea LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 305.8 WANH (Browse shelf) 1 Available I2085590
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Examines the early history of cross-cultural encounter, contact and colonisation in southern New Zealand. Ngai Tahu engaged with the European newcomers from the 1820s, encountering systematic settlement from the 1840s, and fighting land alienation and erosion of resource rights from the mid-nineteenth century. The evolving social world was one framed by marriage practices, kinship networks and cultural practices - a world in which interracial intimacy played a formative role. Recipient of the prestigious Roheath Trust Award and Carl Smith Medal in 2008, Angela Wanhalla (Ngai Tahu) lectures in history at the University of Otago.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [179]-195) and index.

Angela Wanhalla starts her story with the mixed-descent community at Maitapapa, Taieri, where her great-grandparents, John Brown and Mabel Smith, were born. As the book took shape, a community emerged from the records, re-casting history and identity in the present. Drawing on the experiences of mixed-descent families, In/visible Sight examines the early history of cross-cultural encounter and colonisation in southern New Zealand. There Ngāi Tahu engaged with the European newcomers on a sustained scale from the 1820s, encountering systematic settlement from the 1840s and fighting land alienation from the 1850s. The evolving social world was one framed by marriage, kinship networks and cultural practices - a world in which inter-racial intimacy played a formative role. In exploring this history through a particular group of family networks, In/visible Sight offers new insights into New Zealand's colonial past. Marriage as a fundamental social institution in the nineteenth century takes on a different shape when seen through the lens of cross-cultural encounters. The book also outlines some of the contours and ambiguities involved in living as mixed descent in colonial New Zealand.

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