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What's Māori About Māori education? : the struggle for a meaningful context / Wally Penetito.

By: Penetito, Wally [editor.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z. : Victoria University Press, 2010Description: 320 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780864736147 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Education -- Social aspects -- New Zealand | Waihanga | Ako | Tikanga | Māori (New Zealand people) -- Education | MātaurangaDDC classification: 371.82999442
Contents:
Part 1: Framework for analysis: Māori identity: being, learning, living -- What counts as education: scholarship, philosophy, ideology -- What counts as Maori education: socialisation, education, dialectic relationships -- Mediating structures in Māori education: connectedness, consent, control -- Part ll: Mediating structures in the development of Māori education: 'Our Māoris': report on Māori education (1960-2000) -- 'We're all New Zealanders': processes of consultation in Māori education -- 'Tangata whenua, tangata tiriti': institutional marae -- 'Our Pākehās': the onward rise of Māori medium schooling -- Part lll: Place and the politics of whānau, hapū, iwi and Māori education: education for all: He kōingo mo te tuakiri tangata - a hunger for identity, meaning and self-worth.
Summary: "It is relatively easy to critique the New Zealand education system and show how inequalities in the treatment of Māori students have gone on for generations, to the extent that Māori justifiably perceive the system as being inherently biased against them. It is far more difficult to explain why Māori, despite their warrior heritage, persist in seeking out compromise positions with a dominant mainstream, or how they can do this without allowing a kind of refining or 'thinning out' of what it means to be Māori. The slogan popularised in the mid-1900s, following Sir Apirana Ngata's familiar aphorism, 'E tipu e rea' - reinterpreted as 'we want the best of both worlds' -- has not diminished in salience, and indeed may even have taken on a more strident note in the contemporary form 'we demand the best of all worlds'. This is a story about what it feels like to be a Māori in an education system where, for more than a century, equality, social justice and fairness for all New Zealanders has been promised but not adequately provided. It was not until the late 1970s and early 1980s that ordinary Māori in a few key communities throughout the country courageously stepped outside the Pākehā system and created an alternative Māori system in order to whakamana (enhance) their own interpretations of what it means to achieve equality, social justice and fairness through education. The question now is, what has the dominant mainstream education system learned about itself from the creative backlash of the Māori 'struggle for a meaningful context', and what is it going to do to address the equally important question of 'what is an education for all New Zealanders?'." -- Publisher's information.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Māoritanga Hāwera LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 372.82 PENE (Browse shelf) 1 Available I2085175
Māoritanga Ōpunakē LibraryPlus
Non Fiction
Māoritanga 371.82 PENE (Browse shelf) 1 Available I2089095
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A unique critique of the history and contemporary practice of Maori academics, this examination argues that equality of education has been promised but rarely delivered in New Zealand. It was not until the late 1970s and early 1980s that ordinary Maori in a few key communities throughout the country courageously stepped outside the mainstream system and created an alternative Maori system in order to enhance their own interpretations of what it means to achieve equality, social justice, and fairness through education. Engaging and thorough, this insider's account explores the Maori point of view and asks what "an education for all New Zealanders" really means.</p>

Includes bibliographical references (p. 290-307) and index.

Part 1: Framework for analysis: Māori identity: being, learning, living -- What counts as education: scholarship, philosophy, ideology -- What counts as Maori education: socialisation, education, dialectic relationships -- Mediating structures in Māori education: connectedness, consent, control -- Part ll: Mediating structures in the development of Māori education: 'Our Māoris': report on Māori education (1960-2000) -- 'We're all New Zealanders': processes of consultation in Māori education -- 'Tangata whenua, tangata tiriti': institutional marae -- 'Our Pākehās': the onward rise of Māori medium schooling -- Part lll: Place and the politics of whānau, hapū, iwi and Māori education: education for all: He kōingo mo te tuakiri tangata - a hunger for identity, meaning and self-worth.

"It is relatively easy to critique the New Zealand education system and show how inequalities in the treatment of Māori students have gone on for generations, to the extent that Māori justifiably perceive the system as being inherently biased against them. It is far more difficult to explain why Māori, despite their warrior heritage, persist in seeking out compromise positions with a dominant mainstream, or how they can do this without allowing a kind of refining or 'thinning out' of what it means to be Māori. The slogan popularised in the mid-1900s, following Sir Apirana Ngata's familiar aphorism, 'E tipu e rea' - reinterpreted as 'we want the best of both worlds' -- has not diminished in salience, and indeed may even have taken on a more strident note in the contemporary form 'we demand the best of all worlds'. This is a story about what it feels like to be a Māori in an education system where, for more than a century, equality, social justice and fairness for all New Zealanders has been promised but not adequately provided. It was not until the late 1970s and early 1980s that ordinary Māori in a few key communities throughout the country courageously stepped outside the Pākehā system and created an alternative Māori system in order to whakamana (enhance) their own interpretations of what it means to achieve equality, social justice and fairness through education. The question now is, what has the dominant mainstream education system learned about itself from the creative backlash of the Māori 'struggle for a meaningful context', and what is it going to do to address the equally important question of 'what is an education for all New Zealanders?'." -- Publisher's information.

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