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Live to tell / Lisa Gardner.

By: Gardner, Lisa [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Gardner, Lisa, D. D. Warren: book 4.Publisher: New York : Bantam Books, c2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: 388 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 1409101045; 9780553807240 ; 0553807242 ; 9781409101055; 9781409101048; 1409101053.Subject(s): Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction | Warren, D. D. (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Boston (Mass.) -- FictionGenre/Form: Detective and mystery stories.DDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: Danielle often thinks about that night when her childhood ended. The sound of her father shooting her mother and then hunting down her brother, as she cowered under her duvet, trying to drown out the sound. She can remember the sound her brother made as he was killed. And she can remember her father standing in the doorway of her bedroom, saying 'I'm sorry, Danielle...' before he turned the gun on himself. Haunting enough for any child, but Danielle has always wondered, why not her too? Why did her father let her go? Years later, Danielle is working in a hospital that deals with the most violent and damaged of children. And someone there knows something about her past, and is prepared to kill to keep it quiet...
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Suspense South LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction GAR (Browse shelf) 1 Available A00621659
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Danielle often thinks about that night when her childhood her ended. The sound of her father shooting her mother and then hunting down her brother, as she cowered under her duvet, trying to drown out the sound. She can remember the sound her brother made as he was killed. And she can remember her father standing in the doorway of her bedroom, saying 'I'm sorry, Danielle...' before he turned the gun on himself.</p> <p>Haunting enough for any child, but Danielle has always wondered, why not her too? Why did her father let her go?</p> <p>Years later, Danielle is working in a hospital that deals with the most violent and damaged of children. And someone there knows something about her past, and is prepared to kill to keep it quiet...</p>

Danielle often thinks about that night when her childhood ended. The sound of her father shooting her mother and then hunting down her brother, as she cowered under her duvet, trying to drown out the sound. She can remember the sound her brother made as he was killed. And she can remember her father standing in the doorway of her bedroom, saying 'I'm sorry, Danielle...' before he turned the gun on himself. Haunting enough for any child, but Danielle has always wondered, why not her too? Why did her father let her go? Years later, Danielle is working in a hospital that deals with the most violent and damaged of children. And someone there knows something about her past, and is prepared to kill to keep it quiet...

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Library Journal Review

In her newest thriller (after The Neighbor), Gardner once again successfully borrows from the headlines. Detective D.D. Warren is called to the home of a family of five-four of whom are now dead and the fifth, the dad, lying comatose in the hospital. What initially appears to be a simple, if horrifying, case of murder/suicide quickly turns into something else when a second family is found dead at home. Warren's investigations run parallel to the stories of two other women. Danielle Burton is the lone survivor of the murder of her own family by her father 25 years ago, while Victoria Oliver is living in near isolation as she cares for her severely mentally disturbed eight-year-old son. The connections among the three plot threads become increasingly clearer as both women are drawn into Warren's investigation. Verdict Gardner's writing gets stronger with each new thriller, and the scary possibilities this novel suggests are certainly plausible enough to work. This will strongly appeal to suspense readers, especially for fans of Tami Hoag, Karin Slaughter (see her Broken, reviewed on p. 80), and Tess Gerritsen. [Library marketing; Gardner participated in the Thriller panel at LJ's 2010 Day of Dialog, held May 25 at New York's Javits Center.-Ed.]-Jane Jorgenson, Madison P.L., WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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