Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The child's child / Barbara Vine.

By: Vine, Barbara, 1930- [author.].
Publisher: London : Viking, 2013Description: 279 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780670922215; 9780670922208; 9781451694895; 145169489X.Subject(s): Murder -- Fiction | Single mothers -- Fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Fiction | Gay men -- Fiction | London (England) -- FictionGenre/Form: Psychological fiction.DDC classification: 823.92 Summary: When their grandmother dies, Grace and Andrew Easton inherit her sprawling, book-filled London home, Dinmont House. Rather than sell it, the adult siblings decide to move in together. The arrangement is unusual, but ideal for them, until the day Andrew brings home a boyfriend. James is a devilishly handsome novelist, but his strident comments about Grace's doctoral thesis puncture the house's idyllic atmosphere. When he and Andrew witness their friend's murder outside a London nightclub, James begins to unravel, and what happens next will change their lives. Just as turmoil sets in at Dinmont House, Grace escapes into reading a manuscript, a novel from 1951 called The Child's Child, never published, due to its frank sexual depictions. The book is the story of two siblings, John and Maud, born a few years after World War I, a story that eerily mirrors the present-day Andrew and Grace.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction South LibraryPlus
Fiction
Fiction VINE (Browse shelf) Available I2120717
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>When Grace and her brother Andrew inherit their grandmother's house, they surprise a few people by deciding to move in together. But they've always got on well and the London house is large enough to split down the middle.</p> <p>There's just one thing they've not taken into account though. What if one of them wants to bring a lover into the house? When Andrew's partner James moves in, and immediately picks a fight about the treatment of gay men, the balance is altered - with almost fatal consequences.</p> <p>As Grace tries to rise above the situation, she's more than happy to oblige a friend when he asks her to read an unpublished manuscript about a young unmarried mother in Devon between the wars. But then the situation in the house takes an unexpected turn and the book begins to seem remarkably, and uncomfortably, close to home.</p> <p>Barbara Vine is the pen-name of Ruth Rendell, and The Child's Child is the first book she has published under that name since The Birthday Present in 2008. It's an intriguing examination of betrayal in families, and of those two once-unmentionable subjects, illegitimacy and homosexuality.</p> <p>'She deploys her peerless skills in blending the mundane, commonplace aspects of life with the murky impulses of desire and greed.' Sunday Times<br> <br> 'The Rendell/Vine partnership has for years been producing consistently better work than most Booker winners put together.' Ian Rankin </p> <p>Ruth Rendell has published fourteen novels under the Vine name, two of which, Fatal Inversion and King Solomon's Carpet , won the prestigious Crime Writers' Association Gold Dagger Award.</p>

"Ruth Rendell writing as Barbara Vine"--Cover.

When their grandmother dies, Grace and Andrew Easton inherit her sprawling, book-filled London home, Dinmont House. Rather than sell it, the adult siblings decide to move in together. The arrangement is unusual, but ideal for them, until the day Andrew brings home a boyfriend. James is a devilishly handsome novelist, but his strident comments about Grace's doctoral thesis puncture the house's idyllic atmosphere. When he and Andrew witness their friend's murder outside a London nightclub, James begins to unravel, and what happens next will change their lives. Just as turmoil sets in at Dinmont House, Grace escapes into reading a manuscript, a novel from 1951 called The Child's Child, never published, due to its frank sexual depictions. The book is the story of two siblings, John and Maud, born a few years after World War I, a story that eerily mirrors the present-day Andrew and Grace.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

©South Taranaki District Council

Contact us